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FeatureLiving Well

The greatest.

Dive into some of Gippsland's 'greatest hits' from notable Gippslandians accompanied by work from some of our fav illustrators.

Jul 28, 2022


Words: Gippslandia
Images: Supplied

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Over one hundred outstanding Gippslandians have been featured in these pages during the past five years. We dropped them a friendly line and asked them for their best bits about the region.

Quickly, we learnt that they love coffee, Gippsland’s natural treasures and log fires when it rains. They shared some golden tips – their ‘greatest hits’ – which you’ll find here, paired with illustrations from some much-loved local creatives.

The High Plains on a crispy, misty morning would take some beating, but a scoreboard showing Swifts Creek had just won a flag would do it...

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What’s the greatest way to start a day in Gippsland?

“With a walk on one of Cape Paterson's beautiful beaches.” — Clint Hare.

“A bike ride along a quiet, tree-covered track followed by coffee with friends.” — Ondrej Foltin.

“To open the zipper on your tent with great caution, so as not to wake your friends, wander over to the warm coals of the previous night's campfire in your thermals and pause for a moment to take in the surrounds of Tidal River.” — Michelle Possingham.

“Undoubtedly with a walk up the Kalimna Hill at Lakes Entrance to watch the sunrise over the Ninety Mile Beach, followed by a heart-starting coffee from Albert & Co.” — Sue Smethurst.

“Waking early with the sound of birds, and the beautiful Gippsland light filtering through trees.” — Maree McPherson.

“With a walk along the Bass Coast, from San Remo to Inverloch, at low tide looking for early Cretaceous fossils.” — Lesley Kool.

“Fishing on Lake Tyers in a canoe.” — Paul Mitchell.

"Look at the sunrise, take a walk in the bush and absorb the nature around you." — Farhat Firdous.

“Undoubtedly with a walk up the Kalimna Hill at Lakes Entrance to watch the sunrise over the Ninety Mile Beach, followed by a heart-starting coffee from Albert & Co.” — Sue Smethurst. Illustration // Anghard Neal-Williams.
“Undoubtedly with a walk up the Kalimna Hill at Lakes Entrance to watch the sunrise over the Ninety Mile Beach, followed by a heart-starting coffee from Albert & Co.” — Sue Smethurst. Illustration // Anghard Neal-Williams.

What’s the greatest view in the region?

“Looking out from Nicholson River Winery.” — Georgia Miles.

“There are so many! But, the otherworldly sunsets – psychedelic colours to dreamy pastels – over Cape Woolamai from a friend’s living room at Kilcunda is a favourite.” — Sue Doyle.

“The Dargo/Licola High Country is pretty life-changing.” — Phoebe Rich.

“There are so many fabulous views on the Warragul to Korumburra road.” — Nigel ‘DJ Nige’ Beck.

“For me, sunset from my front deck, looking west over the Buln Buln valley.” — Ondrej Foltin.

“Jemmy's Point, Lakes Entrance. Always something different to see.” — Ewan Fotheringham.

“The view over ‘the junction’ in Walhalla from the front veranda of Sancreed Cottage.” — Brian Brewer.

“Tough one! The sea from Mt Oberon, the high plains from The Pinnacles, the Entrance from Kalimna, and the Latrobe Valley from Tyers-Walhalla Road!” — Maree McPherson.

“One of the best views is down at Wilsons Promontory, when you get to the top of the mountain and see gorgeous blue oceans. It’s so relaxing and makes you so grateful for where you live!” — Brodie Pyle.

“The High Plains on a crispy, misty morning would take some beating, but a scoreboard showing Swifts Creek had just won a flag would do it.” — Raymond Gallagher.

“There are so many to choose from. Wilsons Prom comes to mind, especially some of the incredibly picturesque coves.” — Farhat Firdous.

“There are so many! But, the otherworldly sunsets – psychedelic colours to dreamy pastels – over Cape Woolamai from a friend’s living room at Kilcunda is a favourite.” — Sue Doyle. Illustration // Lacey Yeomans.
“There are so many! But, the otherworldly sunsets – psychedelic colours to dreamy pastels – over Cape Woolamai from a friend’s living room at Kilcunda is a favourite.” — Sue Doyle. Illustration // Lacey Yeomans.

“The High Plains on a crispy, misty morning would take some beating, but a scoreboard showing Swifts Creek had just won a flag would do it.” — Raymond Gallagher. Illustration // Daisy Grumley.
“The High Plains on a crispy, misty morning would take some beating, but a scoreboard showing Swifts Creek had just won a flag would do it.” — Raymond Gallagher. Illustration // Daisy Grumley.

What is the greatest way to spend a rainy afternoon?

“I haven't been there yet, but I'm looking forward to a leisurely lunch at the Tinamba Hotel, near Maffra, on a winter afternoon. Friends, excellent food, wine and maybe a game of 500.” — Sue Doyle.

“Rainy afternoons are best spent on the short walk to Toorongo Falls. Breathe in deeply to experience the fresh smell of rain in the surrounding trees. You're already wet, so why not enjoy the overspray that comes off the waterfall – especially if you're standing very, very close by.” — Michelle Possingham.

“Tucked in behind the glass at the Metung Pub or the Waterwheel in Lake Tyers, enjoying a glass of local wine overlooking the water. Of course, it helps to have a good book by a local author in hand.” — Sue Smethurst.

“In a local bar, by a fire, with local musos playing, or hiking in Tarra-Bulga rainforest.” — Maree McPherson.

“Definitely by browsing in your favourite local shops. While the weather may be damp, you can cheer yourself up with some local business love.” — Brodie Pyle.

“A cabin with wine, cheese and friends.” — Ryan Leslie.

“The best way for me to spend a rainy afternoon in Gippsland is to place more wood on the fire and bake something deliciously comforting, invite family over and enjoy the company of one another.” — Eleanor Marguerite.

“Rainy afternoons are best spent on the short walk to Toorongo Falls. Breathe in deeply to experience the fresh smell of rain in the surrounding trees. You're already wet, so why not enjoy the overspray that comes off the waterfall – especially if you're standing very, very close by.” — Michelle Possingham. Illustration // Eirian Chapman.
“Rainy afternoons are best spent on the short walk to Toorongo Falls. Breathe in deeply to experience the fresh smell of rain in the surrounding trees. You're already wet, so why not enjoy the overspray that comes off the waterfall – especially if you're standing very, very close by.” — Michelle Possingham. Illustration // Eirian Chapman.

What is the greatest gift you can find in Gippsland?

“I love the everyday pleasure of using beautiful handmade ceramics in my kitchen and for meals. They make a lovely and unique gift. Gippsland has some incredible ceramicists, including Valley Plains Pottery and Gooseneck Pottery. They are also both very special studios to visit.” — Sue Doyle.

“A fresh food basket from Goshen Country Farm.” — Clint Hare.

“Head to Mika & Max in Meeniyan. It’s the coolest store, great for gifts.” — Phoebe Rich.

“It’s people. We all love where we live.” — Nigel ‘DJ Nige’ Beck.

“Time and space. An afternoon or evening at any one of the magnificent galleries, wineries or restaurants dotted in every corner of Gippsland. Or, a day spent immersed in nature soaking up the wonders of the Buchan Caves or the Prom.” — Sue Smethurst.

“[Gippslandia General Manager] Michael Duncan's company.” — Ryan Leslie.

“Gippsland provides so much opportunity with the added quality of a very rich life. A true gift is the renowned local environment, including pristine lakes and rivers, snow-capped mountains and far-reaching coastal wilderness.” — Eleanor Marguerite.

“The community spirit that is the heartbeat of our numerous small towns is fairly contagious and a gift that you will get by spending time in any of them.” — Raymond Gallagher.

“It’s people. We all love where we live.” — Nigel ‘DJ Nige’ Beck. Illustration // Phoebe Rich
“It’s people. We all love where we live.” — Nigel ‘DJ Nige’ Beck. Illustration // Phoebe Rich

What is the greatest night you can have in the region?

“Lanterns at the Winter Festival, pub dinner and a live band.” — Georgia Miles.

“Dinner, drinks and live music at The Cape Tavern followed by a sunset walk along the beach.” — Clint Hare.

“Ever been to a Mallacoota beach party?” — Phoebe Rich.

“The greatest night you can have in Gippsland is getting your groove on to tunes by the likes of 112, Warren G and Ginuwine at Ringers nightclub in Sale. For maximum enjoyment, scream ‘this is my jam’ any time the DJ plays your ‘favourite’ song, and do it often, because you have many.” — Michelle Possingham.

“Camped anywhere listening to the sounds of the mountains and rivers, or the ocean waves rolling in.” — Maree McPherson.

“Sleeping so the next day you can enjoy the rocks, the living world, the good wine and the good day!” — Dr Patricia Vickers-Rich.

“The greatest night you can have where I live (East Gippsland) is enjoying the sky above. A sky filled with the most exquisite show of stars. An uninterrupted display of twinkling lights. To witness to such a sight, so clear, has your jaw drop.” — Eleanor Marguerite.

“New Year’s Eve, Lakes Entrance. Just wait ‘til we can party again!” — Ewan Fotheringham.

“Walhalla Ghost Tours on a clear night with millions of stars above you.” — Brian Brewer.

“The greatest night you can have where I live (East Gippsland) is enjoying the sky above. A sky filled with the most exquisite show of stars. An uninterrupted display of twinkling lights. To witness to such a sight, so clear, has your jaw drop.” — Eleanor Marguerite. Illustration // Carolyn Bryant.
“The greatest night you can have where I live (East Gippsland) is enjoying the sky above. A sky filled with the most exquisite show of stars. An uninterrupted display of twinkling lights. To witness to such a sight, so clear, has your jaw drop.” — Eleanor Marguerite. Illustration // Carolyn Bryant.

“Ever been to a Mallacoota beach party?” — Phoebe Rich. Illustration // Georgia Miles.
“Ever been to a Mallacoota beach party?” — Phoebe Rich. Illustration // Georgia Miles.

Gippslandia - Issue No. 23

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